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A 2008 1.6 Clubman Cooper located in Bristol, UK.


ianwh4

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Greetings everyone, I am about to share my narrative.

In early December, I purchased a pepper white clubman because to its recent chain and some history, despite having a very short MOT of just 1 day.
Upon bringing it home, everything seemed satisfactory. After taking it for a test drive, I noticed a little emission of smoke as I removed it from the driveway.
I am here because the vehicle failed to meet emissions standards.
I have started the process of dismantling, and I will be doing the following tasks:
Seals for the valve stems
Piston rings
A catalytic converter is a device used in vehicles to reduce the emissions of harmful pollutants by catalysing chemical reactions.
Hydraulic pump
And a few additional miscellaneous items

I am extensively studying the Prince engine, however I am starting to regret doing so.

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I am also located in Bristol, namely in Winterbourne. I am now doing the same task as you. I have progressed to disassembling the cylinder head and have started the reassembly process. You can find more details about my engine refresh project at the DIY Engine Refresh section.

I am willing to provide suggestions and, if necessary, tools. Please provide a comprehensive summary of the pollutants detected during the MOT test. Specifically, did the vehicle fail the hydrocarbon emissions test?

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Greetings, I did not get the readout, but the lambda value was above the acceptable range, the carbon monoxide level exceeded the permissible limits, and the vehicle emitted blue smoke when accelerating. It was imprudent of me to hastily make a purchase on eBay, particularly for a used vehicle intended for trading purposes. This decision was solely my own and I acknowledge my error.
I am now located in Horfield, by the way.

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Understood. The most suitable starting point would be the refreshment that you are seeing as a traditional option. (However, it will get expensive!). You may have come across postings from individuals who possess extensive knowledge regarding these engines and generously offer their skills.

I just saw your automobile on Ebay, namely in the section for sold listings. It seems to be rather attractive, and the condition of the engine seems to be satisfactory, without any significant issues. This project seems to be commendable, provided that you had enough room, equipment, and time.

What progress have you made with the dismantling process?

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Indeed, I have been perusing the articles. Fortunately, I do not have an immediate need for the vehicle until the spring, and I am lucky enough to own a garage where I can do maintenance on it. Currently, I have spent around £700 on parts. However, I still need the crossover pipe, camshaft components, and lambda sensors. Well done! I sometimes get pleasure from fiddling!
I am now attempting to secure the engine in place, but, the camshafts have not yet been immobilised. I will attempt another rotation of the crankshaft, but after dedicating a whole day to the task of removing the intake manifold, I had a fit of sulking and indulged in a drink.

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Ensure that you adhere to the guidance provided and only use authentic BMW components or FAI TC and Pierburg products obtained directly from authorised sources. Counterfeit items are of inferior quality and should be avoided.

 

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If you are in the process of removing the cylinder head, it is not necessary to be very concerned about aligning and fitting the camshafts and the tool, since they may be significantly misaligned, making it difficult to properly position the tool. Simply secure the crankshaft in place, ensuring that all the pistons are positioned halfway up the bore, thereby eliminating the risk of valve collision. Simply fasten the camshafts using a 27mm spanner and proceed to detach the camshaft sprockets.

In my opinion, the inlet manifold is the most challenging task I have encountered so far.

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To ensure that the pistons are evenly positioned in the bores, I insert two identical brass rods into the plug holes of cylinders one and two. I use a 1/4 drive 10mm socket attached to a 20mm long extension, which is connected to a small ratchet. For non-turbo cars, I access the inlet manifold bottom bolt from underneath the car's middle section, while for turbo cars, I reach it through the wheel arch.

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