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Warranty problem with a rusty subframe on a W203 coupé


CheresX

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Greetings, I just had a conversation with Mercedes Benz warranty department addressing the issue of a rusted subframe. Evidently, the non-coverage of the issue stems from the fact that the vehicle in question did not undergo regular servicing at Mercedes-Benz on an annual basis. Could someone provide advice on whether or not this is accurate?
The problem at hand pertains to the structural material.
 

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Transport the vehicle to a Mercedes-Benz dealership and request that they conduct an inspection, thereafter advocating on your behalf with Mercedes-Benz UK. There are no assurances on the condition of a vehicle that is over 15 years old and lacks a service history from Mercedes-Benz. However, it is plausible that individuals in comparable circumstances have managed to get the service performed at no cost. It is important to exercise caution while making a partial contribution, since there is a possibility that outsourcing the remaining labour may result in cost savings.

It is unlikely that any entitlements or legal protections would be afforded to you under the 30-year rust warranty, if that is the subject matter to which you were alluding. As far as my knowledge extends, the coverage mentioned pertains only to the body panels of the vehicle. Additionally, according to the terms and conditions, the maintenance of this coverage requires regular inspections conducted by Mercedes-Benz, such as during a service appointment at an authorised dealership, in order to ensure its continued validity.

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The subframe of our R171 SLK vehicle was replaced without any cost incurred after the vehicle reached the age of 16 years. The most recent maintenance was conducted by an independent service provider, indicating that a comprehensive service history from an authorised dealership is not necessary.

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Please do a thorough exploration. The emphasis has mostly been placed on the sub frames of the W204 models, rather than the earlier W203 vehicles. Could you provide more details or expand upon the topic of failure, particularly in relation to photographs? There is a scarcity of reported instances regarding failures in the W203 C class. By whom was the inspection conducted?

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In cases when the rear subframe failure is attributed to the acknowledged problem of internal corrosion, Mercedes-Benz will provide a free-of-charge replacement, irrespective of the vehicle's service history. One challenge lies in the fact that some dealers may lack awareness or exhibit indifference, necessitating the exploration of many dealerships in order to get the intended outcome. Alternatively, it is advisable to consult online forums to identify a reputable dealer in close proximity to your location that is known to stock these particular FOC items. Subsequently, it is recommended to directly approach the identified dealer for the purchase.

However, if Mercedes-Benz determines that the rust is merely rust and not connected to the documented rear subframe failure problem, they will probably maintain their position and assert that if the vehicle did not pass the annual anti-perforation body inspection at an authorised Mercedes-Benz workshop each year, then the 30-year anti-rust warranty is invalidated. Regrettably, this assertion is indeed logical, since MB would argue that had the vehicle undergone annual inspections by an authorised MB dealer, the occurrence of rust would have been detected at an earlier stage, enabling timely intervention to prevent its progression and further deterioration.

 

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The subframe of my 2013 e220 vehicle is exhibiting signs of corrosion. The vehicle had an airbag recall on March 9, 2022. During the health assessment, it was observed that the subframe exhibited signs of corrosion. The service manager expressed his intention to forward the report to the headquarters of Mercedes, since they were in the process of replacing some instances free of charge. However, no communication was received for a period of two months. Upon discovering the email address of the service manager, I proceeded to communicate my concerns over the potential hazards associated with driving the automobile, which I considered posed a risk to the safety of my family. In light of this, I kindly request assistance in obtaining a connection to the Mercedes head office, as I want to escalate my claim accordingly. I received a telephone call last week informing me that an agreement had been reached to replace the subframe in question. Please anticipate further developments in this area.

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The original poster (OP) is engaging in a discussion on the W203 model of the C-Class. It is noteworthy because this is the first instance in which the OP has encountered an individual attempting to acquire or repair a subframe for a C-Class W203 vehicle. The problem has so far been seen mostly with the subsequent 204 series.

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It is imperative that the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA) directs its attention on the issue of structural component failures in Mercedes Benz passenger automobiles.

I am not asserting that Mercedes is the only passenger vehicle manufacturer experiencing rust-related concerns; rather, there are other manufacturers facing similar challenges.

The rear suspension of the C207 automobile is purportedly constructed using lightweight materials like as aluminium. However, there is scepticism about this claim, since it is quite likely that thin, high-strength steels are also used in its production.

In order to provide a thorough inspection of the vehicle's undercarriage, it is essential that the under trays be appropriately removed during the execution of MOT testing.

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The removal of trays from beneath for the MOT, as well as the inspection of plastic sill trims for holes, are prohibited actions. Failure to comply with these regulations would result in a vehicle without coverings being deemed unfit for the MOT. Additionally, the testing of seat belts in relation to child seats is also restricted.

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It has been a duration of ten months, during which the original poster (OP) has not made any further contributions to this particular topic.

The automobile has been successfully purchased by another party.

The vehicle has undergone repairs either free of charge or at a significantly inflated cost.

The subframe experienced structural failure while travelling at a velocity of 80 miles per hour on a heavily trafficked motorway, resulting in the unfortunate demise of the original poster.

Regardless of the circumstances, it seems that the answer will remain elusive.

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Greetings, I appreciate your response. Trays have the capacity to conceal a wide range of imperfections.

It is suggested that a periodic enhancement of the Ministry of Transport (MOT) test for automobiles should be conducted at a frequency of once every five years.

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I am unwilling to provide assistance with Mercedes rear frames due to their lack of coverage, which I believe is the situation for all Mercedes models....and even in such cases, the outside appearance may remain intact while the inside degradation occurs due to the consumption of the "golden body lightener."

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