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The issue at hand pertains to a malfunction in the air suspension system.


Ortsmatt

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I own a W212 model, namely the 2013 E Class Estate variant, which is of the AMG designation. The vehicle has accumulated around 80,000 kilometers. During the preceding quarter, the rear self-leveling air suspension of the car has shown occasional occurrences of collapsing overnight. Occasionally, I encounter a situation where my vehicle requires a little period of time to pressurize before I am able to begin driving. Conversely, on certain occasions, I am able to enter the vehicle and initiate driving without encountering any issues. In the majority of instances whereby the suspension has been deflated, a warning message is shown on the visual interface. However, there are infrequent occurrences where no warning message is presented, despite the observable deflation of the suspension.

I brought the automobile to a nearby independent automotive service provider, who conducted a thorough inspection but failed to identify any instances of leakage. They recommended replacing the air springs as a customary solution, quoting a fee of £1,250 for the service. Based on my proficiency in using spanners and after seeing a few instructional videos, I am confident in my ability to do the task at hand. However, I am hesitant to invest around £600 in acquiring the necessary Pattern Parts manufactured by Arnott, as I need a certain level of assurance regarding the anticipated outcome. In my perspective, in the event of an airspring leak, it is likely that just one side would experience deflation. Conversely, if both sides were affected by a leak, the issue would manifest consistently upon parking, rather than intermittently. Coincidentally, I often park my vehicle on a flat surface, namely on my driveway.

I am inquiring about the existence of a shared location inside the system, whereby a valve, perhaps obstructed by a little amount of debris, may be impeding its correct closure. Can this assumption be considered rational? Are there any other thoughts that individuals may have?

Currently, the system is through a brief period of reactivation, which poses no immediate concerns. However, it is conceivable that this process places more strain on the compressor, perhaps leading to increased wear and, in the event of failure, incurring substantial financial costs.

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I conducted a thorough search of the forum and discovered several posts pertaining to the issue at hand. In my own experience, I saw a gradual decline in the performance of my device, especially with regards to its battery life, as it would significantly deplete overnight. Despite using the method of inspecting for leaks using soapy water, no such leaks were detected. Additionally, I attempted to rectify the situation by replacing the airbags, however the problem persisted without any noticeable improvement. The solenoid was replaced, but, there was no observed effect. Subsequently, the air lines were replaced, resulting in the cessation of nightly pressure drops and the system has been stable since then. I would propose considering a change in airlines as a cost-effective alternative.

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Thank you for your response. I have recently dedicated a few hours to inspecting the underside of the vehicle and doing a thorough examination using soapy water. However, no indications of any leaking were seen. The airline components have a robust construction, with strong polythene lines that are securely connected to brass nozzles at both ends inside my car. The hydraulic system consists of a single feed with a greater diameter connecting the pump to the valve, followed by two smaller feeds branching out from the valve to each individual airspring.
When you mention the solenoid alteration, are you referring to the apparatus that I am referring to as the valve, which has one inlet and two outlets? In the W212 model, the component is positioned anteriorly to the rear bumper and posteriorly to the gasoline tank. The most convenient starting point for substitution would likely be the location where I have been unable to identify any leakage inside the conduits.
Regards

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After having replaced all components on my device, I would prioritize doing the same action. The cost is rather low, and because to the extensive concealment of the lines, the effectiveness of utilizing soapy water cannot be definitively determined. I was unable to detect the aircraft leak on my equipment, even using the appropriate leak spray solution.

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There are two individuals that advocate for prioritizing the alteration of airlines first.

My subsequent inquiry pertains to the optimal means of obtaining the pertinent information. I am intrigued by the concept of purchasing the aircraft in bulk and thereafter adjusting its length as needed. However, I am uncertain if it would be necessary to get new brass fittings at each end as well. Furthermore, it is important to consider how the lines are integrated into each connection. In an online video I saw, the process of replacing a worn-out line included the removal of the old line by unscrewing it. Subsequently, a new brass fitting was inserted into the airspring or valve unit, followed by the insertion of a plastic pipe into the brass fitting using a push-fit mechanism. It is worth noting that once the plastic pipe is put into the brass fitting, it cannot be withdrawn without causing damage to the fitting. Does this assertion hold true in most situations?

Any assistance would be very appreciated, or alternatively, a hyperlink to a suitable video resource.

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The lines are assembled by a push-fit mechanism, requiring precise cutting of the ends to ensure they are completely square. It is advisable to consider treating them as single-use items in order to minimize the risk of potential information breaches. Upon purchasing a replacement valve block from Autodoc, I also acquired a cutter, which, if memory serves me well, was priced at a nominal amount of pounds. Purchasing the airline and fittings separately is a recommended approach, since the official Merc item includes an extraneous brass connection on one end for joining two lengths of airline. However, it seems logical from my perspective to just have a complete and uninterrupted sequence. The brass connection itself is also not inexpensive. It is important to mention that the valve block and lines are equipped with color markings. Therefore, it is advisable to name them accordingly before beginning the disassembly process. The Merc Indy that was used in the given context proved to be erroneous, hence resulting in a multitude of complications. Another someone named Indy made the necessary corrections. Ultimately, I opted to use Mercedes-Benz components, with the exception of the valve block. Recalling from memory, I recall that there were several web sites offering a wide array of airline and fittings. It may be advantageous to consider using Autodoc as a potential source for automotive components. Personally, I have procured air bags and a valve block from this supplier and have not encountered any issues pertaining to the shipping process or other related matters. When examining the suspension, it is advisable to also inspect the plastic height sensor rods. One of my possessions had been damaged at one extremity. I acquired a substitute adjustable metal variant from an online marketplace known as eBay.

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The terms "valve" and "solenoid" may be used interchangeably to some extent. I purchased the lines from Mercedes for around £30. It is worth noting that the lines were provided in separate parts that required assembly, which may be considered unconventional. Additional perspectives on this matter are welcome.

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I have just made a purchase of new lines and connectors. The lines were obtained from Hosemaster and possess a maximum pressure rating of 250 pounds per square inch (psi). As for the connections, they are being sourced from Germany and are authentic Voss products. Interestingly, subsequent to doing a leak testing procedure and disassembling and reassembling the rear solenoid valve from its mounting bracket in order to thoroughly clean the surrounding area and inspect for any leaks (while also documenting the component number), the vehicle has shown improved behavior by no longer experiencing nocturnal collapses. Therefore, it is prudent to refrain from making any alterations until the aforementioned system exhibits more malfunctions. However, it seems that the underlying problem may be attributed to either the airlines or, maybe, the valve mechanism.
Regards

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In order to provide a current status on this discussion topic...

The valve block and all associated lines, including the one connecting the compressor to the valve block, were replaced. The observed impact on the automobile's behavior was negligible - at times, the rear suspension would retain its position for extended periods, such as overnight or even an entire weekend, but on other occasions, it would significantly sag when the car was used. Upon doing an extensive search, I successfully identified Aerosus as a firm capable of providing the desired two rear airsprings at a cost of £244.80, inclusive of delivery charges. Consequently, I proceeded to place an order for a pair of such airsprings. The individuals in question came a few days prior, and yesterday I dedicated a portion of the morning to installing the aforementioned individuals. I am pleased to report that the vehicle remained up when I attempted to use it this morning, indicating a successful outcome. However, I then decided to do a thorough examination of the first MB units that were removed. To accomplish this, I removed the exterior dust shields and securely positioned them in a vice. then, I proceeded to inflate them using compressed air from my compressor. Subsequently, I conducted an investigation to identify any potential leaks. With the exception of a little leak observed at the lower steel clamping band of one unit, it seemed that no other issues were present. I am currently uncertain about the nature of the first issue.

Nevertheless, it is worth noting the perceived lack of authenticity in the valves used by Aerosus, since they do not seem to be genuine Voss products. During my last endeavor involving the replacement of the lines and valve block, I acquired a pair of authentic Voss valves for utilization with my current units. The process of connecting these valves proved to be very uncomplicated - it only necessitated ensuring that the end was cut in a perpendicular manner and afterwards inserting it into place. The installation of the Aerosus units presented some difficulties, since my attempts to insert the pipe were unsuccessful despite my efforts to gently chamfer the pipe's end. Ultimately, I proceeded to detach the valve and then used the newly acquired Voss counterparts that were salvaged from the previous units. I would want to caution anybody who may be considering pursuing a similar path.

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I apologize for the delayed response. I would want to inquire if there exists a ride height sensor specifically located on the back axle.
I had comparable sporadic issues mostly attributed to a faulty sensor and a rigid connection in the control rod mechanism.

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I appreciate your prompt reply. There are height sensors, namely one on each side of the vehicle. Although they demonstrate functionality by effectively alerting me when the suspension has lowered and recommending that I refrain from driving until it has reset, I have refrained from making any adjustments to them.
Regards

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